Friday, June 23, 2017

The School Year by the Numbers


It's that time of year again, where I go back into my files and tally up what classes I covered this year. It was a pretty busy year.

Of the 180 school days, I worked 163. This is up two days over last year. This number does not include the days I worked for summer school (12 four hour days) nor the days I worked at the continuation high school in August before the school year officially began (7 days).

Of those 163 days, I didn't get a prep period for 78 of them. On 64 days I covered an extra period, while on 14 days, the teacher I covered didn't have a prep period.

77 of those days I covered high school classes, 42 of those days I was covering middle school, and 30 of those days I was at the continuation high school. It's interesting how year after year, the percentage of each stays roughly the same.

I didn't work the first day of school nor the last. But, I covered the second day of school and the penultimate day of school, which is kind of unusual for me.

More specifically:
  • English: 55 days and 8 extra periods
    • This year's winner: 11th grade with 21 days and 4 single periods. 
      • I count a "full day" when the teacher has at least 2 periods of that level. A "single period" means the teacher has a different level the whole day, or I covered it on the prep period. 
    • Runner up is 12th grade with 15 days plus 8 single periods.
    • In 3rd place is advanced ELD with 8 full days plus 14 single periods.
    • Then 9th grade with 9 days/4 single periods; 10th grade with 7 days/6 single periods; intermediate ELD with 6 days/1 single period; 7th grade with 5 days/1 single period; 8th grade with 3 days/3 single periods; and beginning ELD with 1 single period
  • Science: 41 days and 13 extra periods
    • This year's winner: 7th grade life science with 16 days and 2 single periods
    • Runner up is Earth science with 15 days and 1 extra period. This is not surprising as most of those days were that one class I covered before and after winter break.
    • Then: biology with 13 days/4 single periods; health with 9 days/4 single periods; intro to health careers with 6 days; forensics/criminalistics with 5 days/2 single periods; environmental science with 4 days/4 single periods; chemistry and physics both with 2 days; and 8th grade physical science with 1 day/5 single periods. 
    • (Wait, one day of 8th grade science? That has to be a record. I'm usually in those classes quite a bit more.)
  • Social Studies: 30 days and 10 extra periods
    • This year's winner: 11th grade U.S. history with 10 days and 1 single period
    • Runner up is 12th grade economics with 8 days.
    • Third place is a tie of 7 days for both 7th grade world history and 8th grade U.S. history.
    • Then 12th grade government with 6 days/3 single periods; 10th grade world history with 4 days/2 single periods; 9th grade geography with 3 days; and the continuation high school's orientation at 3 days/1 single period
  • Math: 32 days and 10 extra periods
    • This year's winner: Integrated Math I (which replaced algebra 1) with 18 days and 5 single periods
    • Runner up is Integrated Math II (which replaced geometry) with 11 days and 6 single periods
    • Then 7th grade math with 6 days/1 single period; algebra 2 with 4 days/5 single periods; 8th grade math with 3 days/4 single periods; and business math with 3 days/1 single period
  • Special Education: 16 days and 21 extra periods
    • Note: These days overlap with the above numbers as I would cover something like a special ed. biology class. Or, I'd be a co teacher for 7th grade math. 
    • Of those days, 7 days/8 single periods were RSP (as in, co teacher); 5 days/9 single periods were in SDC (or self-contained special ed.); and 3 days/4 single periods with classes that were... pretty low academics wise.
  • Miscellany: 
    • 3 single periods ASB
    • 8 single periods school newspaper (both at the continuation high school and the traditional high school)
    • Art: 4 days/2 single periods
    • One single period of theater, two single periods of choir, and one single period of music appreciation. (Kinda grateful that I didn't have any middle school band horror stories this year.)
    • Two single periods of sports (I think they were both golf this year) and one period of P.E.
    • Spanish: 1 day/2 single periods
    • Business and/or computers: 5 days/3 single periods
    • And one period of "roving" where I covered two different classes in one period. (I was supposed to cover three classes, but the other two teachers took too long.)
Looking back at this, it's funny what I do remember and what I don't. I guess that's why I write the blog.

I cherry pick the stories I use. I go for "interesting". So, it may seem like the kiddos are wild, do no work, or aren't learning anything. But as you can see from the above, I worked far more days than I mentioned on this blog. Those are the days where everything goes right, the kiddos behave well, and progress towards educational goals are met.

This is a yearly reminder that the educational system isn't so bleak, and kids today are much like kids of the past.

Happy summer.

Previous years' stats:

29 comments:

  1. Wow! Do you keep all this for your files or does the school system provide at least some of the information? Be well!

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    1. I've always kept a calendar for my info (although I say it's a backup in case the district loses my paperwork). When I started doing these posts, I began keeping a tally sheet for the year.

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  2. It's really interesting to see a sub's stat sheet. I never really thought about it before I started following your blog, but a full time sub must have to be very flexible with all the different places they go and subjects they cover. You must have to know a bit about everything.

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  3. I find this post interesting, I'm going to guess it's because I'm in Accounting and like numbers haha You had a busy year :)

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    1. I'm glad. I expect this to be fairly dry and boring, so it's nice to hear you found something in it.

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  4. So are there any plans to be a regular teacher?

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    1. Nope. Nuh-uh. Never. Not gonna happen.

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  5. What a busy year! I know I've asked before and I know you've said it before, but...how will your summer be?

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  6. That is impressive how you have documented everything which I think is important. It shows how busy you have been no how much you had to live by the seat of your pants

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    Replies
    1. I like that variety. It's not for everyone, but it works for me.

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  7. You were busy and you kept great notes. So....I hope you have a vacation of some sort planned out for your summer!

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  8. I'm with the comment from Cindy. Are you going to get a regular classroom or do you like subbing? You certainly do get a variety of assignments subbing and great blog fodder! Arizona has a teacher's shortage (of course they don't pay very well and our school scores aren't the best). They are even relaxing the policies a bit on who can substitute. Conversely in the Virginia area just outside of Washington, DC my niece can't get a teaching assignment for 2 years in a row and has been subbing (albeit consistently working). Tight market there. She's hoping this is the year she'll get a full time assignment, along with her boyfriend, as I think they want to move forward with their relationship, i.e., marriage, but don't want to unless both are full time employed.

    Have a great summer! Plans to work any summer school?

    betty

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  9. Hi Liz - fascinating to see all that you've covered and it's good to know that education is, essentially, doing a fine job - and I'm glad you give us stories that are interesting ... congratulations on keeping records ... cheers Hilary

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  10. You certainly had a busy year! I didn't know substitute teachers worked that much.

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    1. Considering that many days there weren't enough subs to cover all the teachers who were out, we could work more...

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  11. Such a great post! A lot of thanks for sharing.

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  12. Hi Liz, welcome to the holidays. I hope you have something cool planned. Are you happy doing the Sub work or are you hoping for a permanent spot?

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  13. I find it fascinating that you keep such detailed records! Have you ever caught yourself wishing the kids would give you a little something worth posting?
    Visit me @ Life & Faith in Caneyhead. 😉

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  14. Looks like your highest tally is in English.

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  15. Wow that's a lot of days! Neat that you keep such stats on it all :)

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  16. Wow. For some reason it never occurred to me that subs were so...multifaceted. For whatever reason, despite your stories, I always imagined that subs were focused towards a given subject; but now I see you really are all over the place.

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    1. Some do stick to one subject or area. Since I refuse to cover elementary school, I've tried to be flexible within the ages I cover.

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  17. That's a lot of work days! I wouldn't have guessed you'd be that busy, but I suppose if you're working in a big enough school district, it makes sense. Both of my daughters mention substitutes all the time now that I think about it.

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  18. I don't know what it's like where you are obviously, but over here we have more substitute teachers than we can shake a stick at. Someone getting that much work (heck, even half that much) must be pretty highly respected. Good job.

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    1. Thanks. I know some areas that are hurting for full time teachers. I guess it's just an area thing.

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  19. Its neat your students don't want to let you down.

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